#DailyDisconnect: Ending My Social Media Obsession

2 Flares 2 Flares ×

This post may contain affiliate links. Click here for our Disclosure and Privacy Policy.

I am a complete victim and champion of my generation. I spend hours mastering Facebook, and can text without looking at my phone. My Instagram is full of throw away photos, and I rarely talk to my friends on the phone. This project is to help me appreciate the tools and technology I have, as well as experiment how this affects me socially. It’s a test of my efficiency as a person without great technological aide, and my ability to entertain myself. The ground rules are detailed, but they’re to prevent me from creatively finding loopholes and weaseling a sneak with Candy Crush Saga. I hope that I accomplish a few highly procrastinated tasks, and give myself a little freedom from the electronic-dependent lifestyle I’ve created for myself.

Source: Flickr

Source: Flickr

Ground Rules:

  1. I can keep my cell phone on me; however, I cannot use it for anything other than emergency calls (which I will disable the call setting for anyone who is not immediate family or my boss thanks to the iPhone’s Do Not Disturb. If something is emergent, I should address it). Texts will be taken as “pages” and I will not read the message, but rather just see who sent them and choose to call them back via a ground line or when I get home. Again, I will make an exception for work-related messages, since this isn’t meant to inconvenience my bosses nor co-workers.
  2. I can use the internet for checking my email, but I cannot use social media or similar networks. I can make reasonable exceptions as needed for work (such as instant messaging to communicate with co-workers). I will check my Facebook messages as I would check my e-mail, since most of my friends don’t have my e-mail address, but do my best to not check notifications.
  3. I can resume use of my cell phone as a phone when I am at home, because I don’t have a hard line phone. This includes checking voicemails and returning calls, but still not texting or using apps.
  4. I can use my laptop at home for a light amount of personal use. I will only use it while sitting at a table as if it were a desktop. If I use it at work, it should be treated as a separate work computer. Rich Life, Poor Girl will still be updated and is considered work.
  5. I can watch TV via Hulu and Netflix. Hulu Plus offers shows the next day, which is the same way I would watch a recorded VHS. There are even commercials! I’ll do my best to not Netflix binge, but treat the service more like a physical movie rental service. I wouldn’t have more than 3 rentals at a time, so I won’t be marathoning anything unless I really thought I’d have that many rentals.
  6. For the sake of navigation, I can use Google Maps (the app or website) to figure out how to get around before I leave the house. I cannot use the search or GPS functions, so I will find things based on my knowledge, addresses, and cross streets. I’ll write down directions and pray I don’t miss a turn.
  7. I’ll listen to mixed CDs and the radio instead of an iPod, Pandora, or Spotify. I have a few 90s mixes to help me keep in the spirit.
  8. I will take physical documentation, and then convert it to electronic. My blog posts about this will be written as rough drafts in hand and then transferred to type. I can also continue my unhealthy habit of taking pictures of my food and cat, but I will limit myself to 24 photos a week (as if I had a film camera). I’ll also use 24 photos for a special event or other occasion where I would otherwise buy an extra roll of film.
  9. I cannot ask someone do something that is off limits for me or engage in conversation about social media. For example, I can’t have anyone check my Facebook or let me know what Britney Spears is tweeting. I must use my discretion to decide between what is loyal to my goal and what is the most logical choice. The point is to relieve myself of the technological dependency; not ignore technological advances and conveniences.

I’m starting this challenge on February 15th for 30 days. I don’t expect it to be easy, but I am hoping to feel a new sense of connection with people before I turn into a girl who is completely disconnected from face-to-face experience. I want to go on walks when I’m bored and discover a new restaurant. I want to greet people as I pass them by instead of looking down and tweeting. I want to go to an interview and actually speak with eloquence and ease. I don’t want to rely on technology as my means of achieving interaction and entertainment.

Source: Disney/Pixar

Source: Disney/Pixar

I encourage you to join me, even if it means you are just putting your phone down for a few hours. Challenge yourself to lessen your dependency on technology, and let’s both learn to appreciate the advances we do have instead of complaining about how we have an iPhone 5 when the iPhone 6 has been on the market for months, or that there isn’t enough data connection to update our statuses.

This post may contain affiliate links. Click here for our Disclosure and Privacy Policy.

2 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 0 Google+ 2 Pin It Share 0 Reddit 0 Email -- 2 Flares ×
About Jayda
Jayda Knight is a twenty-something in Los Angeles. Her background in online journalism, coupon clipping, and addictive shopping inspired her to create a website for women to save money and have fun. She enjoys cooking (and grilling) whatever mix-matched items she can find in her fridge, and splurges on craft beers and Disneyland trips.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*


2 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 0 Google+ 2 Pin It Share 0 Reddit 0 Email -- 2 Flares ×